Search
  • Dr Paul Penn

Latest YouTube Video: Studying: what students do vs. what works (and why)




In this video I explain why some of the approaches to studying that students use most often tend to be the least effective.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TYpUT63thEo&t=3s


References:


Bjork, E. L., & Bjork, R. A. (2011). Making things hard on yourself, but in a good way: Creating desirable difficulties to enhance learning. Psychology and the real world: Essays illustrating fundamental contributions to society, 2(59-68).


Dunlosky, J., Rawson, K. A., Marsh, E. J., Nathan, M. J., & Willingham, D. T. (2013). Improving students’ learning with effective learning techniques: Promising directions from cognitive and educational psychology. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 14(1), 4-58.


Karpicke, J. D., Butler, A. C., & Roediger III, H. L. (2009). Metacognitive strategies in student learning: do students practise retrieval when they study on their own?. Memory, 17(4), 471-479.


Koriat, A., & Bjork, R. A. (2005). Illusions of competence in monitoring one's knowledge during study. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 31(2), 187.


Kornell, N., & Vaughn, K. E. (2016). How retrieval attempts affect learning: A review and synthesis. Psychology of learning and motivation, 65, 183-215.


Soderstrom, N. C., & Bjork, R. A. (2015). Learning versus performance: An integrative review. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 10(2), 176-199.


Yue, C. L., Storm, B. C., Kornell, N., & Bjork, E. L. (2015). Highlighting and its relation to distributed study and students’ metacognitive beliefs. Educational Psychology Review, 27(1), 69-78.


Please subscribe to this channel and turn on notifications if you are interested in its content. This will really help the channel develop. Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dr_Paul_Penn Visit my website : www.drpaulpenn.com



3 views0 comments